Skip to content

This new entrance cultivates the relationship of Houston Christian University (then known as Houston Baptist University) to Houston and the world. The goals of the symbolic doorway are to extend a significant presence of the campus along Highway 59 and its 275,000+ daily commuters, create an entry threshold to the campus, develop a processional boulevard and better unit the campus and city with Belin Tower as its epicenter.

The vision for the landscape supports an active and engaged student body while also creating a more lush, leafy green campus. The main entry boulevard is expanded into a pedestrian-friendly walking route. Mature shade trees create a comfortable microclimate in areas for students to gather, eat lunch, rest, and maybe read a book or check email. The gathering areas along the main entry boulevard provide seating, lighting, and places to relax so that students can enjoy time outdoors and connect with each other.

Location

Houston, Texas

Collaboration

Falon Land Studio

Design Team

Kevin Barden, Joe Rivers and Hung Nguyen

Renderings

Rivers Barden Architects

Typology

Commercial

Date

2020

Process

Explore

Champions Golf Pavilion

The new Founder’s Patio at Champions Golf Club offers an exciting opportunity for dining, relaxing and enjoying the golf club. Located along the golf side of the existing clubhouse, the design respects and resonates with the existing architectural language on the property, while amplifying and adding to the experience of club.

Lulu Lin

Culture and Community

In this episode, our resident architects Joe Rivers and Kevin Barden visit with Lulu Lin, an art duo from Houston, Texas. Lulu Fang and Amy Lin of the art duo Lulu Lin took their years long partnership to a new level when they opened Honey Art Cafe in late 2016. Joe and Kevin sat down with Lulu Lin to discuss their beginnings in art and art lessons, and their experience building a business completely on their own.

The Architectural Vernacular of Houston

Writing

As the architectural historian Paul Oliver aptly puts it, “All forms of vernacular architecture are built to meet specific needs, accommodating the values, economies, and ways of life of the cultures that produce them.” In this article, we will explore the various dimensions of architectural vernacular and why it is essential for crafting designs that resonate with the heart and soul of Houston and the Gulf Coast.